Author Topic: Positive and negative impacts of indigenous people in a hot desert  (Read 1589 times)

Simon

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Hi all,

Attempting to make some revisions to our SOW in light of the 2012 changes to the OCR A spec and have ground to a halt!

The spec mentions candidates need to know the positive and negative impacts of indigenous groups in a hot desert environment.

Desertification does feature later on in the spec but I'm struggling to research and resource easily identifiable negative impacts.

I did however find this story http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-19183297 but I can think of a number of issues in using this particular resource to deliver the stated learning intention.

Any suggestions most greatfully received!

swhitch

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Re: Positive and negative impacts of indigenous people in a hot desert
« Reply #1 on: October 25, 2012, 07:33:59 PM »
Rather thrown by the need for it to be indigenous but would have thought oil exploration (Kuwait/Iraq - Saddam Hussain had quite a negative impact in setting fire to oil wells)  or Copper mining (Chile - Chiquicamata mine - worth a look on Google Earth)?
« Last Edit: October 25, 2012, 09:57:45 PM by swhitch »
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Blue Square Thing

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Re: Positive and negative impacts of indigenous people in a hot desert
« Reply #2 on: October 25, 2012, 08:03:21 PM »
I suppose there may be examples where indigenous groups have stopped development or tourism (or objected to it anyway) - Uluru or Kakadu perhaps? Maybe some examples of desertification, but that's not really making that much sense in the indigenous element is it?

But, frankly, it's really, really odd wording. Isn't there *any* guidance as to what this might mean?
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Victoria

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Re: Positive and negative impacts of indigenous people in a hot desert
« Reply #3 on: October 25, 2012, 08:24:07 PM »
Agree with the others - strange wording.  I'd contact the subject officer for clarification if I was you.  (Perhaps that should say I would attempt to contact the subject officer for clarification... I'm still not sure she exists, and if you do ever get a response I'd imagine it'll say something really helpful like "You are free to interpret the statement in whatever way you wish, and fit the statement to your chosen case studies".) 

Simon

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Re: Positive and negative impacts of indigenous people in a hot desert
« Reply #4 on: October 28, 2012, 03:52:23 PM »
Thanks all, it does seem a little strange on the wording so its to the exam board I think! I'll keep you posted!


squirt2209

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Re: Positive and negative impacts of indigenous people in a hot desert
« Reply #5 on: October 31, 2012, 08:39:19 PM »
Not sure if this is of any interest?
This gentleman Yacouba Sawadogo used traditional techniques- "Zai holes" to reduce the impact of desertification.

http://www.1080films.co.uk/project-mwsd.htm

Simon

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Re: Positive and negative impacts of indigenous people in a hot desert
« Reply #6 on: October 31, 2012, 10:15:37 PM »
Thanks so much for the link, it will be very useful for us in a few lessons :) looks like an intersting story!

Simon

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Re: Positive and negative impacts of indigenous people in a hot desert
« Reply #7 on: November 04, 2012, 09:52:18 PM »
Hi all,

In case it was keeping you awake at night I had some feedback from the exam officer at OCR for spec A. To date, my experience with him has only been positive and he has been keen to work through issues we have had...

"Hi Simon,
 
In terms of 'indigenous people' there is no strict definition but we are thinking along the lines of Tuareg, San, Bedouin etc. - some of whom are undergoing or have undergone change in their lifestyles. A useful link here regarding trying to define indigenous: http://www.iwgia.org/culture-and-identity/identification-of-indigenous-peoples
 
The whole of Enquiry Question 6 is looking at peoples use of hot deserts, much like in the 2009 version of the spec, to include how, why and scale of use (indigenous people, tourists, MNCs). The use of 'named indigenous people on a named hot desert environment.' is to make it clear that we are expecting detailed knowledge and understanding about a real indigenous group in the desert that the students are studying, rather than generalisations that could apply to any desert region. Much like in similarities and differences we want that depth of knowledge and understanding of the chosen places to study. In terms of assessment this will link into the different levels within the mark scheme - Low level candidates making simplistic generalisations and top level candidates really showing that they know about these people and places. In terms of impacts on the environment, this could link well with other areas of the spec e.g. sustainable farming methods, over-cultivation etc. The exploitation of energy and mineral resources is much more likely to be at the MNC/National scale.
 
Hope this helps - please do get in contact if anything isn't clear or you have any further queries.
 
All the best,
 
Gavin
"

I sent back the following...

"Hi Gavin,
 
Thanks for this...  I appreciate your feedback on this but I want to still clear up a few things here...
 
For example, we are looking at the Bedouin of the Sinai as our named group of indigenous people. In terms of negative impacts on the environment, as they traditionally lead a nomadic lifestyle the issues of overcultivation don't really apply to this group.
 
While we will come to look at desertification later on, which will certainly affect some groups which could be considered indigenous, the spec does state "negative impacts on the environment for a named group of indigenous people".  Your reply would suggest that it would be better if the indigenous group we study is a group of people living in the desert whose use contribute negatively to the environment and cause some of the triggers for desertification. If that is the case, would you then agree that the Sinai Bedouin (or other nomadic groups) are not desirable primary examples to use with students to meet the needs of the new spec?
 
Many thanks,
 
Simon"

He responded with...

"Hi Simon,
 
No, nomadic groups (like Sinai Bedouin) are absolutely fine to study. The final column details "impacts" on the environment and this is the main point. Considering what impacts their lifestyle has on the environment they live in - be it positive and/or negative, weak and/or strong.
 
Kind regards,
 
Gavin
"

Seems as though what is required here is an assessment of indigenous groups environmental impact rather than a more rigid approach which documents the positive and negative impacts of their use. That isn't really obvious in the wording of the spec but I hope it helps those doing the forced last minute curriculum planning for this new improved and rigorous  specification ;)


Geogphotos

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Re: Positive and negative impacts of indigenous people in a hot desert
« Reply #8 on: November 05, 2012, 09:06:12 AM »
What about impacts as a result of population/resource balance changes? For example, formerly nomadic people settling around water holes.

Pop growth leading to overgrazing, increased demand for fuel leading to deforestation at oases.

 

anything