Recent Posts

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 10
1
General Discussion / Re: Health maps
« Last post by keigs on Today at 12:41:28 PM »
http://www.theguardian.com/society/2014/oct/29/how-sick-are-worlds-healthcare-systems-nhs-china-india-us-germany

Comparisons of different health care systems around the world - good for AQA 'A' Level.
2
General Discussion / Re: uprush
« Last post by Blue Square Thing on Today at 11:49:31 AM »
The point about not being able to ask for a definition if the term isn't specifically in the syllabus is a general one that, afaik, applies to all exam boards these days.
3
General Discussion / Re: uprush
« Last post by GB geographer on Today at 11:38:29 AM »
Jon Wolton of Edexcel's view is:

I would agree with your definition Alan.
Neither term is specified in the specs - only constructive and destructive waves - so which terminology teachers use to teach these is not prescribed by us.
Mark scheme contents are usually only indicative on this kind of thing (unless it's a 'define the term' question and, as I've mentioned, we couldn't ask for that because it's not specified in the specification)  so a range of (sensible/correct) terms would be credited.

So either would be fine to use...
4
General Discussion / Re: uprush
« Last post by Blue Square Thing on Today at 11:28:28 AM »
Ultimately, the 'correct' answer for many will be what the exam boards will be expecting... I'll ask Jon Wolton :)
I've been in examiners meetings where mark schemes have been adapted because "it says <such and such> in <a book> so we'd better let them have it even though it's not really right"... ;-)

I suspect uprush would be accepted and is quite possibly technically correct in that it's part of the whole swash process, although it's not a term I ever used back in the day. Wiki includes it and the definitions look reasonable (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swash)  and are sourced - although I've not verified either source. There are certainly other examples of the term being used in published literature - for example http://www.jstor.org/stable/4298413 - so it's not just something that a geography teacher made up (which, err, happens ime...), There are 40,000 or so g-hits for the search term uprush waves compared to 176,000 for swash waves - so it's certainly less used but still a term that seems technically correct.

I imagine either term is just fine.
5
General Discussion / Re: uprush
« Last post by GB geographer on Today at 10:22:10 AM »
It's similar to the use of the term crust and mantle... technically it's lithosphere and asthenosphere with the boundary a little blurred...

Uprush is the movement of water up the beach which is part of the whole process of swash (which also includes backwash) and the swash zone is where this turbulent flow occurs.

Ultimately, the 'correct' answer for many will be what the exam boards will be expecting... I'll ask Jon Wolton :)
6
General Discussion / Re: uprush
« Last post by ElliC on Today at 09:42:42 AM »
My HoD and I have just been going through this book as well (and compared it to the 2nd edition which clearly describes it as the swash). We are VERY confused as we have never heard of this before either!
Are we teaching this wrong or are they wrong??
Elli
8
General Discussion / Re: Ebola -new hope?
« Last post by Stephen A.Schwab on October 29, 2014, 08:33:09 PM »
New resources on Ebola crisis on the GA web site very soon.
9
General Discussion / Japan-volcano shocker.
« Last post by Stephen A.Schwab on October 29, 2014, 08:31:47 PM »
10
General Discussion / Japan-volcano shocker.
« Last post by Stephen A.Schwab on October 29, 2014, 08:30:53 PM »
Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 10
anything